849 N. Buffalo Dr. Saratoga Springs, UT 84045801-368-3927carl@saratogaspringstennis.com

When Should I Restring My Tennis Racquet?

Post 37 of 40

Are you one of those players who only restrings their tennis racquet when the strings break? If you are, you’re missing out on a lot of performance from your racquet. Strings lose their tension over time and the more you play the more tension is lost. A good rule of thumb is to restring your racquet based on how often you play. Say you play two times a week. Then you should, at a minimum, restring your racquet twice a year whether you’ve broken the strings or not. If you play more often, say four times a week, you should restring your racquet at least four times a year. Every change of season is a good reminder.

There are exceptions to this policy. With the newer polyester (poly) stings, you need to restring more often. These strings don’t stretch as much as nylon or synthetic gut and they lose their elasticity faster. As a result, your racquet will start to feel dead and the only way to bring it back to life is with a new string job. But, these strings do have an upside—a very big upside in my opinion.

What I really like about poly stings are they don’t break very often and you can really take a long, hard swing with them. You’ll also notice that they don’t move around in your racquet; lowering the wear and tear on your strings. If you have long, hard swings and break strings often, these are the strings for you!

A word of caution though, poly stings can be tough on your arm.  If you suffer from tennis elbow or other arm problems, you may need to experiment with these stings. If you have difficulty with a full poly string job, you can try a hybrid string job. In a hybrid stringing job the main strings are strung with poly and the cross strings are strung with nylon/synthetic gut. Not only is this string job easier on your arm it is also easier on your wallet since a full poly job can be expensive.

You’ve paid a lot for that expensive racquet; keep it playing well with a good, new set of strings—your game will love you for it!

See you on the courts!

Carl

 

This article was written by admin

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